This Week on The Homestead: Homesteading Progress and Preps For The Week / June 2, 2018

Lot’s of new stuff going on with the blog this week…

First off, I no longer own or have anything to do with the content or operation of my old site the survivalist blog – it is under new ownership. Please note that I did not sell the content that was published on the site I only sold the domain.

If you want an archive of the best-handpicked articles from that site then please order a copy of the Bullet Proof Survivor CD. It’s pretty awesome!

After having so much frustration trying to sell my Amazon.com (repeatedly making me prove that I own the copyrights to my book and funny reporting of sales etc.) I decided once again to remove my books from their marketplace and to make them available directly to the consumer via this site.

If you want a few new copies are still listed on Amazon from third-party vendors at some ridiculous prices – for example, my book The Prepper’s Guide To Surviving The End of The World As We Know It is now being listed for over $620.00!

The good news is that you can get it from me for only $12.97 just click on this link and download it instantly!

I’ve also made my other books available as instant downloads for $12.97 each… just click on the corresponding link to the book that you’re interested in below…

Other new stuff this week includes some brand new T-Shirt designs that are available in my store – please check those out (and buy a few) at MDCreekmore Designs.

A couple more blog related updates before we get into this weeks segment.

Since moving to this new site, I’ve had several people ask about where they can make a donation to help support this site okay, I set up a page for that here. You can also, find a link to the page in the top navigation menu where it reads “Support Us“.

And others who want to help support the site when they order from Amazon.com (at no extra cost to them) have asked about my Amazon affiliate link so I set one of those up for you all. You can find it in the right sidebar… see it?

If not then here it is again – Amazon Affiliate Link – please bookmark that link and use it every time as your entry point when you shop at Amazon.

Okay, now what about homesteading and preps for the week…

Squash is starting to grow… finally…

The chicks are growing up fast and should start laying in a couple more months… Yea!

This week I started cleaning out this fence-line…

Added this top to my workbench in my shop…

Bought more seed to add to the stockpile.

Well, folks, that’s it for me this week… What about you… what were your preps and homesteading progress? Looking forward to reading your comments below.

 

M.D. Creekmore

I've been interested in self-reliance topics for over 25 years. I’m the author of four books that you can find here. Over the years, I’ve learned a lot about prepping, homesteading, and self-reliance topics through first-hand experience and now I want to share what I’ve learned with you.

198 Responses

  1. Gloria says:

    Saw the urologist and I had a catscan done which I’ll see him about later in June. The stone finally passed a few days ago and the relief is undescribeable. Time to catchup on all the jobs I couldn’t do earlier.

    ODS bought me another 3 dozen quart mason jars so I think I might have enough for the season now. Got about 5 lbs of fresh ginger on clearance for $2 so lots of dehydrating when I can find time. Picked 8 lbs of rhubarb for the freezer.

    Bought soft dog food for my pooch whose tooth extraction went well. Only downside is the opposite side tooth also needs to come out so we’ll have to save up for that.

    I worked the elections advance poll and I’ve never spent 5 more boring days in my life – turn out was poor. Money is good and much needed to cover car repairs. Only downside is the job kept me inside for 11 hours a day for most of the week. Darn! Now I’m doing catchup gardening as I can. The pesky mouse is still pulling out my onion bulbs so I reset them and dusted them with cayenne pepper. If I don’t, then we won’t have any homegrown onions. Also found rabbits hiding under our garden wagons so time to keep the lawns cut now that our heatwave has passed.

    • Jean says:

      Glad you got rid of that nasty, painful stone!

    • Almost There says:

      Gloria,

      Glad the stone is gone. Did the ACV concoction work or did you not try it?

      • Gloria says:

        I did try the ACV receipe, three times over 2 days and it helped a fair bit but didn’t dissolve the stones enough to pass. Just enough for some relief which is always helpful. If I get a stone again, I’ll do the ACV right away and see how it works early in the game. The urologist said mostly drinking a LOT of water would help push a stone out faster.

        • Mari says:

          Gloria, glad you’re out of such painful misery. Did the urologist know which kind of stone? That’s assuming you were able to capture part of it.

          • Gloria says:

            I tried to catch the stone but missed its exit so we don’t know it’s cause. I was told I’d feel it trying to exit, but I didn’t.

  2. Jean says:

    Good morning everyone. Hope you are feeling better MD.

  3. Prepared Grammy says:

    How do you store the seed in your stockpile?

    • Prepared Grammy,

      I store seed in military ammo cans that are kept in my basement where it’s cool inside even during the summer months.

      • JP in MT says:

        Any idea how long they’ll keep that way?

        • JP,

          Any idea how long they’ll keep that way?

          I store seeds in a similar fashion and have had some seeds still viable after 5 years. We’ll often stock up on seeds at the end of the season when they go on sale for as little as $0.08 per package and these generally still work well for years. To cover expired seeds we often overplant, since at that price you can afford to use more than you might want and thin the extras if need be.

          • JP in MT says:

            That’s what I was wondering. If it keeps, I can take advantage of sales and use as needed.

        • Greg M. says:

          I too have stored seeds in a dark, cool location and they have been ok for several years. Used some sunflower seeds after 3 years and had a real nice crop. Used some pumpkin seeds after two years and they did fine. Give it a try. We also buy seeds at the end of summer when they go on sale and the stores are just trying to get rid of them.

      • Prepared Grammy says:

        I have some in the freezer. Do you think that’s wise, or should I store all of them in cans in my basement?

        • Gloria says:

          Some believe storing seeds in the freezer will kill them but it’s how the world storage of heritage seeds is done at Spitzbergen, Norway – in deep freeze.

          For home freezing I’d highly recommend vacuum sealing them or kept in tight lidded jars so freezing does not rob them of any natural moisture or cause freezer burn.

    • Prepared Grammy says:

      This Week:
      I”m off work for the summer. We officially start back to school the middle of August, but I’ll be in my classroom in about a month to get everything ready. I will be teaching first grade next year, and I’m really excited.

      -Please take a moment to remember those who paid the ultimate sacrifice for our freedom. I’m especially remembering a young man who was KIA several years ago. He would be 33 years old. His life was taken too soon, and I grieve with his mom. AP was a wonderful young man, and I will never forget his kindness to my son.

      -The water supplier has water running to everyone, and we never lost water. In fact, our district had a Plan B that kept us with full pressure.

      -Added to the stockpile: a LOT of baby wipes (Caught a super sale.), canned beans, canned fruit, rock salt, peanut oil, canned vegetables,

      -Goats: Took doeling to the vet because I didn’t feel like the infection where she was disbudded was healing quickly enough. The vet said I was good at caring for animals, even sick or injured ones, and I need to be more confident in my skills and knowledge. He said, “You’ve got this licked. You know what you’re doing. She’s fine.” It’s good to know I’m doing the right thing.

      -Chickens: Lost one hen. She was simply dead in the coop with no obvious reason.

      -Bees: Did a full inspection of hives, and I’m glad I did. I have 4 shallow 10 frame boxes full of honey. I added another shallow. (That’s about all I can lift when it’s full of honey.) One hive appears to have requeened itself. I’ll check it again soon to see how it’s doing.

      -Home: Still more purging, cleaning, and organizing.

      -Garden: Planted the last of the garden: 5 more rows of sweet corn and 1 row of white potatoes. I did it in the rain, but I did it. The garden is about 50’ x 60’ and I have 3 raise beds that are 4’ x 8’, but I still don’t feel like it’s big enough.

      -Preserving: Put up 10 pints of strawberry puree and three batches of strawberry jam.

      -Information: Researching new canning recipes.

      -Health: More active now that warm (hot) weather is here.

      -Skills: I guess I’m learning how to care for animals. (See above.)

      -Miscellaneous: *Put new tires on Husband’s truck.
      *Getting the camper ready to go. Our first trip of the year is to camp and do a LOT of fishing with friends. We’re in Louisiana now and having a blast.

      Be prepared. Stay safe. He’s in charge.

      • Moe says:

        Prepared Grammy:
        Do you have trouble with the raccoons getting into your sweet corn? I rely on my niece gifting me corn because I don’t want to attract the one raccoon family in the area.

        • Prepared Grammy says:

          Coons and squirrels love my sweet corn. We got an electric mesh fence last year. That’s really helped the situation.

        • Shirlgirl says:

          One year that I grew corn, I placed a blinking blue light Christmas light strand about 1 ft high around the corn patch. No Coons- although there were prints everywhere on the outside of the chain link fence. Now, looking for a way to keep the javelina out. They seem to push their way through the smallest breach in the fence at ground level. We have boards on both sides of the chain link. Rebar or stakes holding the fence in place and braces nailing the fence to the exterior of the board. I figure by now my tomatoes cost me $50 each….

          • Almost There says:

            Shirlgirl,

            I would get an electric fence that is solar powered and run a strand or 2 of wire along the bottom and on the outside of the fencing.

      • mom of three says:

        If your on Facebook, look up The Bellingham Blend, last Monday my husband, dad and two other guys sang at a Memorial for our fallen soldiers, this is the third year the guys have done this…

        • Almost There says:

          Mo3,

          They are great…

          • mom of three says:

            Thank you, they all really enjoy it my husband loves singing with my dad, I’m behind the phone, doing all the recording.

        • mom of three,

          If your on Facebook, look up The Bellingham Blend, last Monday my husband, dad and two other guys sang at a Memorial for our fallen soldiers, this is the third year the guys have done this…

          I’m on Facebook; but, didn’t bother going there and easily found them on YouTube. I love acapella groups and used to sing in one myself years ago. Another group you all might enjoy from Perdue is Straight No Chaser. Not only do they sing well; but, they perform well. I especially like their rendition of The 12 Days of Christmas
          It’s 20 years old; but, still enjoyable.

          • Almost There says:

            Here’s another group that is awesome. Home Free…

            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FKp9K9kmtFA

            • Almost There,

              Here’s another group that is awesome. Home Free…

              They’re not A cappella; but, still pretty sweet. I grew up playing guitar and a little banjo and singing mostly folk music; but, the blend of the old folk music and the newer mountain country genre make a nice mix.

              • Almost There says:

                TOP,

                They most certainly are a cappella. There is no instrument being played when they sing. A couple of the guys make sounds like drums, etc. They are THAT good. Just like Pentatonix.

                Home Free is an American a cappella group of five vocalists, Austin Brown, Rob Lundquist, Adam Rupp, Tim Foust, and Adam Chance. Starting as a show group, they toured around 200 shows a year across the United States.

                • Almost There ,

                  They most certainly are a cappella. There is no instrument being played when they sing. A couple of the guys make sounds like drums, etc. They are THAT good. Just like Pentatonix.

                  You are correct. I listened to it again and did a bit of research and I have to say I’m amazed. I found the following article:
                  How Vocal Percussion Made It’s Way Into Home Free
                  http://homefreemusic.com/how-vocal-percussion-made-its-way-into-home-free/
                  That states in part:

                  My brother/bandmate, Chris, was researching more resources, and he discovered an instructional series called Mouth Drumming by Wes Carroll, the vocal percussionist for the group The House Jacks. I promptly ordered Volume I and IU on VHS! Kids, you’ll have to ask your parents what a VHS is

                  Here is a sample video of Mouth Drumming by Wes Carroll:
                  https://youtu.be/dwg8rBcQL0k
                  This is pretty amazing; but, along the same lines, here’s a nice piece of imageryplayed on ly o nguitar. It’s on ly 6 ½ minutes long and worth the eatch.
                  Jose Feliciano – “The Entrance to Bilbao” – TV Appearence
                  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6V6bMPTaLrs
                  Jose Feliciano BTW is now 75 and I’m really feeling old, LOL.

    • Crazy Joe says:

      Evening Grammy ……. I use Tupperware for seeds , ammo , fishing lures / hooks / line – air tight so they float . Have used military surplus ammo cans but the weight is a factor to me – yes durable but heavy . The plus to Tupperware is that it is basically clear so I can see what seed packets are in what container . All other brands stink in my opinion – I love Tupperware .

      Also I have several of mom’s Tupperware containers now going on 45 – 50 years of age and still sealing tight . Of course those were made in America .

      • Almost There says:

        Crazy Joe,

        I also LOVE my Tupperware. I started buying it a couple of years ago, not knowing they were still around. All quality stuff and the warranty can’t be beat. I love the marinating trays they have, the power chef, and the modular mates. But my favorite is the Thatsa bowls. They have handles so if my hands are messy processing some fruit or veggie, I can still hold on to the bowl.

    • Livinthedream says:

      Hi, PG & all! Seed Savers Exchange blog sheds light on how to save seed: http://blog.seedsavers.org/blog

  4. Jean says:

    I hit the blog second this morning! Love the tee shirt, ‘Politically Incorrect’. You should host a contest with us coming up with shirt sayings!
    I spent this last week trying to. Keep my garden from drowning with all this rain! Been keeping really busy outside (which I love by the way). Having a time with chipmunks of all things sneaking around and trying to nibble. Think they are cute, but……pesky! Cut back an entire embankment of ivy (big job), and pleased that it is done! Getting ready to help a friend about to have triple by-pass surgery. Plan to stay with her a week to help her with meals, a bit of. Rehab and be her cook and transporter. Wish me luck!

    • Almost There says:

      Good job Jean.

      Hoping to get me some peaches off The Peach Truck this week. Georgia peaches, nothing like em.

      • Jean says:

        I’ve heard it should be a great crop!

        • Livinthedream says:

          Hope you’re right about the peaches. lost every peach on my trees (12) to 3 consecutive freezes. Chilton co., AL peaches are out, tho.

    • cgbascom says:

      Jean, I have sent a prayer up for you and your friend. What a good and loyal friend you are.

    • Jean ,

      I spent this last week trying to. Keep my garden from drowning with all this rain!

      We’re hoping to get our garden put in this upcoming week, since it’s been way too wet to plant. Good luck on keeping your garden going and hopefully the rain will let up a bit to help us both.

      Having a time with chipmunks of all things sneaking around and trying to nibble. Think they are cute, but……pesky!

      Once upon a time we had that problem; but, a small herd of barn cats took care of them and most of the squirrels. Cat’s can be a good force multiplier.

      Getting ready to help a friend about to have triple by-pass surgery. Plan to stay with her a week to help her with meals, a bit of. Rehab and be her cook and transporter. Wish me luck!

      I had quadruple bypass nearly 20 years ago, and well remember those first weeks at home that would have been impossible without my DW to help. It’s good your friend has you to help, since there are very strict limitations for the first few weeks and some things you just cannot do yourself or without a lot of help.
      Your friend is lucky to have you on board.

    • Bam Bam says:

      Jean, that is a great idea. I hope M.D. sees it. If M.D. selects the saying, you could get a free t-shirt. That would be a fun contest. Maybe it should be a t-shirt design contest.

  5. JP in MT says:

    Two weeks ago:

    DW and I came down with something like food poisoning Friday night. Took us both out all Saturday and most of Sunday. Oldest GS graduated on Sunday, made it to the ceremony then went home.

    Spent 3 days on the woods as a cook for the guys working at the church’s kid’s camp site, getting it ready for next month. No radio, no TV, no internet, no cell service, …. Wonderful.

    The day I get back from the woods, the mechanic says that if you leave the passenger rear sliding door open, the van runs. Seems the PCI bus is like a string of Christmas lights; one goes out, none work. So, we are leaving the passenger door as a manual opening one, and we are up and running again! Just have to remember that the remote won’t lock the door anymore. The van’s replacement is still on the list, but now I hope it will be next year.

    I did stop at Costco and grab some rice to put up. Coupled with my Augason Farms order of eggs and banana’s, stocks are looking up.

    This last week:

    Stayed home Memorial Day weekend. Got the camper cleaned & prepped, generator reinstalled/fueled/checked, satellite receiver installed; getting everything ready to use. Had the family come over and put up portable garage for ATV’s. Got the “dog box” put on the back of the ATV (now the dog can go for a ride).

    Found a book at the Thrift Shop. Publisher note from 1866, “The Southern History of the War” by Edward A. Pollard (2 volumes in one book), reissued/printed in 1977. Sounded interesting.

  6. Fixit says:

    Well the last two weeks Went to a meeting last Saturday that looked at Puerto Rica and Venezeula living conditions ..Have 8 ducklings that look like they will make it . I lost 3 .
    Pulled out my cast iron kettle that I haven’t used in a few years . It is a #15 . I need to start getting it ready for October 11th 12th 13th .. Here in Hohenwald Tn. I will post more on this later once I talk to M.D. about it.
    Well need to get things ready for our monthly meeting in Linden Tn. today . Class is on making slaves . Taking kudzu filmed for the potluck .

    • cgbascom says:

      Fixit, a class on making slaves?

      • Fixit says:

        Salves. The thing is I reread before I post.and still it autocorrect for me.

        • cgbascom says:

          OK, sounds better. Thanks. Don’t you just hate it when a machine “thinks” it knows better than you?

          • Fixit says:

            Autocorrect was programmed by leftist who think they know better than ” the common” people . And that also why the default word was slaves .😈

            • Penrod says:

              Well, knowing how the enemy plans on making slaves after TEOTWAWKI could come in handy. Know thine enemy and all that. Salves could be useful after avoiding enslavement, tho!

              • Penrod,

                Well, knowing how the enemy plans on making slaves after TEOTWAWKI could come in handy. Know thine enemy and all that. Salves could be useful after avoiding enslavement, tho!

                Salves and poultices could well be useful; but, we already know the plan from the old maxim: “Armed men are citizens, unarmed men are subjects”.
                Our founding fathers were subjects and when they fought to become citizens they added the 2nd amendment to ensure that would always be the case.
                I’m not really sure how much difference there is between a slave and a subject.

                • Zulu 3-6 says:

                  TOP,

                  Subjects get blunt tipped kitchen knives. Slaves get nothing.

                  • Zulu 3-6 ,

                    Subjects get blunt tipped kitchen knives. Slaves get nothing.

                    I stand corrected, LOL.
                    However, a shovel or long handled pick with proper training can be pretty lethal.
                    In the ancient Japanese empire, only the elite could own edged weapons; but, the farm tools like the Bo Staff, NunChaKu and other “farm implements” are still rather effective.

            • Livinthedream says:

              Now that’s funny!

            • Fixit,

              Autocorrect was programmed by leftist who think they know better than ” the common” people . And that also why the default word was slaves .😈

              There was a time I would have laughed at the thought of your comment as useless conspiracy; but, in the post Obama, Hildebeast should have won era, and with purposeful censoring of conservative viewpoints by social media companies, I would no longer be surprised. The cost of freedom has always been eternal vigilance and that may be more true now than ever before.

  7. Zulu 3-6 says:

    Did my weekly shopping and added to my grocery stash as usual.

    Got the food grade 5-gallon buckets and put the gravity drip water filter units together. Easy to do even for me. I skipped using Schrader valves as #1 daughter wasn’t interested in one for her unit. I just drilled a 1/16th inch hole in the top edges of the buckets to relieve any vacuum. #1 daughter was tickled to death when I gave the one to her.

    Granddaughter is moving right along with her verbal communication skills. She is now saying the “S” word (yes, same as that in SHTF). Ah, well. It was bound to happen with her around cops and military people. At least it wasn’t her very first word like it was with her mother. So far, she is just using it occasionally at “appropriate” times, not just randomly. We’re doing the same thing with her as we successfully did with #1 daughter – ignore it and not make a big deal out of it.

    Since hurricane season is here again, I spent the past weekend going through my stuff, making sure batteries are charged up, etc. I used my solar chargers to do some of the top-off work to make certain they’re working OK, but it was too cloudy for a real test. I’m already good for food and water (I hope). I got some more propane for my camp stove last week (which I think I already reported). I should take some time when it isn’t raining and scrounge up some fuel wood and tinder for my rocket stove and get it drying. I have quite a bit of propane, but it won’t hurt to have the rocket stove ready to go also. After all, a direct hit by a real hurricane is a thing of concern, instead of these jumped up rain storms they call SUB-tropical storms.

    I know a lot of us Florida Wolf Pack members are pretty well up on hurricane preparedness, but I found a decent basic guide while bumbling around online. http://www.heraldtribune.com/news/20180528/sarasota-hurricane-veterans-guide-to-season

    Nothing new in it for me, but nice to give to friends and neighbors who are new to Florida or have their head someplace it shouldn’t be.

    June 1 was also the start of Florida’s week-long sales tax holiday on hurricane supplies. The list of exempt supplies is actually rather limited. I can’t think of anything I really need to get other than another couple extra cases of water maybe. Never can have too much potable water. I’ve also got three new WaterBobs standing by. Bottled water isn’t on the exempt list as it’s already sales tax-free as a grocery item.

    • Almost There says:

      Z36,

      While grocery items are not tax free in TN, I forgot to report on my post, that I also found 24 pk of 16.9 oz, BPA free, purified drinking water at Aldi’s for $1.89 a pk. Got 4 cases. Score.

      • Almost There,
        Aren’t you forgetting another important thing that happened? You worked hard for it, and need to tell the pack for a little inspiration to those who are thinking about it. You need not give any details of course,

      • Bam Bam says:

        Aldis is the best.

    • Zulu 3-6,
      Good deal on the bucket filters.
      I only put Schrader valves on two of my lids as an experiment. All they do is allow water to be processed a little faster; but, other than that the gravity drip filters also work fine.
      This is the least expensive way I’ve discovered to process bulk potable water.

    • Bam Bam says:

      Zulu,

      Thanks for the link. That was a good article. I am surprised a newspaper published a photo of a rifle and a gun. One thing they left out was telling people to have a wrench to turn off their water and telling people to locate their sewer popper (which can be buried under mulch) and make sure they can unscrew the top. I can’t believe the number of people who don’t realize their toilets can back up and flood their homes with raw sewage.

  8. cgbascom says:

    This week has been rainy and cold. Gardening is down to ‘what can I do in ten minutes’? Broccoli and cauliflower go in today and cabbage, tomorrow. I was gifted 6 small tomato plants from a neighbor and have those inside at my kitchen window. Cucumbers and beans went in last week and are doing well. I have forms laid out for two raised beds and during the summer will lay out four more beds to get ready for next spring.

    My husband is doing very well on his rollator/walker. He aches from the therapy, but he is standing taller and getting outside more often. He works well with the aides that come in (I suspect it’s because they give him a foot/leg massage and hand massage-every day that they are here) and enjoys other faces to talk to. I expect a happier hubby this year.

    MD, when I went to Amazon and even Ebay to look for paperback books to buy, I was surprised to find a book that I wanted to replace one that was falling apart was going to cost me $310.00 new and $120.00 used. It didn’t take me long to realize that I was going to be paying for ink, paper, machinery, and labor for that book. Physical books are becoming obsolete.

    Have a great week, everyone. God Bless.

    • cgbascom,

      Yes, the prices are ridiculous…

    • cgbascom ,

      when I went to Amazon and even Ebay to look for paperback books to buy, I was surprised to find a book that I wanted to replace one that was falling apart was going to cost me $310.00 new and $120.00 used. It didn’t take me long to realize that I was going to be paying for ink, paper, machinery, and labor for that book. Physical books are becoming obsolete.

      With my vision issues I tend to look for audio books or computer file based books like .txt & .pdf, that my Text to Speech software can read to me; but, I do understand the crazy prices physical books, especially older ones, are getting up to, or at least those that are being asked.
      I have a used; but, mint Hardcover copy of “Unintended Consequences” First Edition by John Ross, with slipcover. Amazon currently has the following prices for that book: 2 New from $251.71, 12 Used from $122.99 & 3 Collectible from $250.00
      It’s a good read; but, for $100.00 or even $50.00, I’ll part with it without thinking, especially since I also have a pdf of that same book.

      • cgbascom says:

        Knowing what used books are going for on Amazon and ebay/half.com, I wonder what yard sale books will go for this year? Of course, the benefit to the buyer at a yard sale is the fact that many sellers don’t want to store what is left over, especially books in any form. We have a thrift store that will not accept books during the summer. They get too many and can’t store the extras and are often not able to give them to another thrift store. And they are inundated with yard sale leftovers during the summer. Fortunately, their shelves are full of books during the winter.

        • Babycatcher says:

          I just bought two books at a yard sale for 1dollar each.

          • cgbascom says:

            Yeah!!! So there is hope for us “hold it in the hand” book readers. I know. A kindle is a book you hold in your hand. And I have one. But, sometimes you just want a good old fashion book. Although, I can’t understand why when you touch the bottom corner of the page, it doesn’t flip over to the next one 🙂

        • Livinthedream says:

          I generally pay one dollar for hardcover and fifty cents for paper. I have hundreds of books, including collectibles.

    • Mari says:

      Book sales at libraries, thrift stores, anyplace similar to Ranch Hope, yard sales, Strand (in NYC, which might have a website).

  9. Thor1 says:

    Puppy is a prepper,, he has his own bugout bag….LOL I put dog food, treats,water bottles a chewbone a toy(ball) and his flea/tick/heart medication in it. I didn’t think he could pack it himself or it would be all treats and a toy……LOL

    Got my NRA digital camp bag for joining another 5 years.

    The tomatoes are growing like crazy and I’m harvesting lettuce left and right.

    Trying some new growing techniques for garlic and first attempt at growing an avocado tree. The Mrs loves those.

    Been getting a lot of rain so watering the garden should not be an issue.

    Listening to an audio book on you tube called Going Home…….seems good so far…….

    Heard about visa/master charge credit glitches in UK….might be a red flag….

    • Thor1 says:

      Thee audio book is rated R……

    • GA Red says:

      Thor1 – I’m still taking my avocados in and out of the house as weather permits. The healthiest one came from my compost bin. Good luck. Love the puppy stories too.

      • Thor1 says:

        Ga Red I know they don’t like frost at all but what about rain and hot weather?

        Thanks for the Puppy likes……. He is getting a big head from all the fan mail….LOL

        • Izzy says:

          Thor 1; Not too, too much rain for avocados, but hot weather doesn’t bother them.

        • GA Red says:

          Mine are in pots that drain pretty well, but they haven’t minded all the rain we’ve had lately. They do seem to enjoy the heat though.

        • Bam Bam says:

          My avocado tree was three feet tall. I died during a freeze this past winter. They are very easy to grow. But they really hate cold weather.

          • Thor1 says:

            Bam, you couldn’t have died in a freeze living in Florida……. LOL

            Besides, your typing…….. LOL

    • Prepared Grammy says:

      My dog is a prepper too. She’s adding extra body fat to survive being without food. Lol.

      • Thor1 says:

        PG, wold that be an internal bugout bag ???? LOL

      • GA Red says:

        PG – I have a cat like that. He plans to “live off the fat of the land” when SHTF, as the DH says. When he lays down, he’s nearly as wide as he is long.

        • Thor1 says:

          Puppy is not fat…….pure muscle. I run him daily several times. Give him plenty of water to keep his tendons hydrated as he likes to leap in the air. Although, he is eat a Buffalo right now…..LOL

          • GA Red says:

            Thor – I also have a cat like your puppy, although at 12 years of age, he is having a harder time doing some things. He is solid with abs of steel, it seems. He weighs in at about 20 pounds.

      • Penrod says:

        ‘Flab’ is a scurrilous term for a Portable Modular Emergency Energy Reserve System.

    • mom of three says:

      I have a small backpack, for kitty too we put treats, we get free samples of cat food I toss it in and soft food, I found a foam type sticker that sticks to the backpack with a cat and the Meow on it so everyone in the house hold knows it’s her bag.

  10. Out of my T-Shirt designs this week this one is my favorite… What do you think?

  11. Goatlover says:

    I went elderberry hunting and got enough to start 1 quart and 1 pint of tincture. It’s my first attempt at it, hoping it works! Harvested my small patch of peanuts this morning. Almost finished piecing my very first quilt! Bought a rather extensive collection of Do-Terra essential oils for alternative medical treatment. Also ordered in a couple of bottles of Thayer’s Witch Hazel that has aloe, vitamin E, and Rose Petal essence in it. That stuff has already worked wonders on a rash I’ve had on my forearm for months. Three days of Thayer’s and it’s just about GONE. Been battling the mess created by more than a foot of rain here. Lime helps to knock back the smell in the chicken yard and it helps reduce the number of flies…I cover it with a thick layer of pine shavings though so the birds don’t get burned by the lime. Same thing with the goat pens. YUCK! Will be slicing a bunch of tomatoes today to put in the dehydrator. (I have a LOT already canned.) The dehydrated ones can be used in place of sun-dried tomatoes. That’s about it I think. Blessings to the Pack!

  12. suzy q says:

    Saw the oncologist who said see you next year for the last time. Finally got an appointment to see a dentist about pulling two teeth that broke. I had to threaten to get reassigned before they would make the appointment. I miss my old dentist.

    For some reason my energy level is low and I’m easily tired so some days I only get one thing done besides work.

    Restarted my garbage service as I lost my way to get to the transfer site.

    Spending is limited as I have a large ticket to cover shortly.

    • Almost There says:

      suzy q,

      I’m interpreting that the oncology visit was goods news and if my interpretation is correct, that is great news. There are days I do nothing except go to work and come home and veg out. I feel guilty, but then, my mind is really tired from all the craziness at work.

      • suzy q says:

        Almost There yep 4 years out from major surgery. If you make it 5 years without a reoccurance they figure everything is ok.

        • Almost There says:

          suzy q,

          Praise the Lord. Prayers for you to get your strength back.

        • Anonamo Also says:

          Susyq
          , I don’t want to bust your bubble, but you should be looking into natural preventatives NOW.
          Many people think they are clear and the terrbile diagnosis is just around the corner… much easier to prevent with diligence than to treat… It begins with clean filtered water,good nutrition, a strong immune system…as the answer to both preventing and treating this massive horrid disease.. The stop for this is out there but is being blocked because of the money factor…..
          My Aunt had that same discussion with her Doc and in 11 months they found a reoccurance…She has been one of the lucky ones and has fully recovered. It was a different form…and it was all gotten via surgery.
          There are several options, and information is out for no and available. Use “duck duck go” search . Graviola tea can be consumed safely 3 or 4 times a week for a preventative,… or twice daily for active mal- growth….is cheap ..easily available…….as can organic beets/carrots, and heavy alkaline diet,( which can include baking soda/in small measures.)

          • Anonamo Also,

            The stop for this is out there but is being blocked because of the money factor…..

            Do you have proof for this assertion?
            The person, team, or company that finds a definitive cure would make billions and win a Nobel Prize. The oldest of my god daughters is working on this very problem and funding toward that end goal is freely available. Tons of money has already been spent; but, it’s a hard multifaceted problem to solve, with no single therapy to treat all varieties, at least for now.

            • Izzy says:

              OhioPrepper; The pharma companies already make billions off cancer meds. Why would they want to cure something to stop their current…and growing, gravy train? It has been known for decades that there are cures for many types of cancers, but curing cancer would put surgeons and cancer pharmas out of business.

              It took less time, with less sophisticated equipment to find cures/vaccines for polio, smallpox, etc. Many meds with expired patents are now costing 4 plus times as much as they did when initially discovered. And in generic form. Now why is that? Big pharma has the biggest lobbyists in D.C. Why exactly do they need lobbyists if “funding” is “freely available?

              • Izzy,

                The pharma companies already make billions off cancer meds. Why would they want to cure something to stop their current…and growing, gravy train?

                For the same reason they’ve developed everything, to make profits for their shareholders, and lumping them into the generic “ pharmaceutical companies” doesn’t tell the entire story. The individual company that develops the “cure” for cancer will own the market and the subsequent profits and all of the competition will be gone.
                Also keep in mind, that these companies are run by people who individually or collectively (friends and family members) are subject to these same disease processes and would no doubt like to see a cure for themselves or their loved once, just in case.

                It has been known for decades that there are cures for many types of cancers, but curing cancer would put surgeons and cancer pharmas out of business.

                Known by whom? If it’s common knowledge and proven effective, there are numerous groups more powerful than Pharma or the AMA that would fight for these cures. President Trump just sign the “Right to try” bill into law that should make such things easier.

                It took less time, with less sophisticated equipment to find cures/vaccines for polio, smallpox, etc.

                True; but, each of these had a common relatively simple vector that could be targeted to create the cure or vaccine. Disease processes like Cancer and Alzheimer’s are extremely complex and the cause, treatment and cure of each cancer type are also both different and complex.

                Many meds with expired patents are now costing 4 plus times as much as they did when initially discovered. And in generic form. Now why is that?

                I don’t know. What I do know is that all of my medications are generic and relatively affordable and in the case of Atorvastatin Calcium (Lipitor) my costs have dropped more than 80% since the patent expired and the generic became available. For medications other than those I take, I have no point of reference.

                Big pharma has the biggest lobbyists in D.C. Why exactly do they need lobbyists if “funding” is “freely available?

                First you have to define freely available. Alll of the funding comes from those profits, billions of which are spent on research, clinical trials and the FDA approval process.
                Another reason they an others have lobbyists, is quite frankly to protect themselves from the often greedy and corrupt politicians in the DC swamp.
                The gun owners have lobbyists as do the ham radio operators and the home builders and real estate brokers & their agents, quite frankly to keep the control freaks in DC from adding more controls and picking our pockets.
                Finally, if you think big Pharma is making tons of money, you can purchase some stock as I’ve done, and share in those profits.

        • Jean says:

          Praying for you!

    • Izzy says:

      Suzy q; Have you had your thyroid checked?

      • Prepared Grammy says:

        When I felt like that, my iron level was low. I was taking supplements, but they were the wrong kind. Now I take a slow release iron tablet every day. It’s done wonders for my energy level.

        • Prepared Grammy,

          When I felt like that, my iron level was low. I was taking supplements, but they were the wrong kind. Now I take a slow release iron tablet every day. It’s done wonders for my energy level.

          I have similar problems with lower than normal Hemoglobin, although my blood iron level is normal.
          The hematologist noticed that my blood works shows some inflammation; but, now that I’m off of the anticoagulants the next thing is to try and resolve the hemoglobin issue, perhaps with some ANSAIDS. I eat healthy and exercise; but, sometimes you just have to fight the genetics, that often seem a constant vigil.
          Sometimes it takes more than just a simple pill.

      • suzy q says:

        Not recently although I do need to go and have a blood test done. Just haven’t had a chance to get it done.

        • suzy q says:

          Prepared Granny that is what led me to the cancer diagnosis 4 years ago. My blood count was down around 5.4 for hemoglobin and hematacrat. People were amazed I had driven myself to the hospital. It was 5 hours from my house – it took 2 days but that included driving to a flea market, working at that, doing some mystery shopping before driving the last hour to my state’s largest city and finding the hospital.

          • Anonamo Also says:

            After all you have been thru anemia is possible as an absorbtion issue. I fight anemia continually because i do not have the enzymes to allow utilization…according to the Dr who gave me diagnosis…” Liver is the perfect food”, I am now glad desicated liver comes in capsules.(lol)

            • Prepared Grammy says:

              My hemoglobin level was always high. It’s only in the last few years that it’s been down. (Except for a time when I had a health issue when I was younger.)

              • Anonamo Also,

                ” Liver is the perfect food”, I am now glad desicated liver comes in capsules.(lol)

                Capsules?
                When you can purchase liverwurst and properly prepared liver & onions is great. I know some don’t like the texture or the taste; but, I grew up on it along with souse, head cheese, mush, and scrapple. The good thing for us is that when we purchased that half angus last year, no one in the split wanted the liver, tongue, heart, kidney or bones, so we really scored.
                I personally think that some of our modern ailments are in part due to the fact that our palate has become very limited and that limitation keeps us from eating the variety of foods our ancestors ate. Liver in capsules is just one example, LOL.
                Too many people eat a crap diet and then think or hope the vitamin pill will cover them

    • Bam Bam says:

      B-12 could be the issue as well. I would do a week of B-12. If you start feeling better after three days, take it daily. If that doesn’t help after a week, try iron. Your doctor can run tests for both B-12 and iron deficiency. But supplements work so quickly and are not dangerous in low doses, I would just start them. If you just want to feel better and don’t care about knowing whether it is iron or B-12, then take both. Note that you can’t take iron with calcium, as the calcium binds with iron so that your body cannot absorb it. Take regular vitamins in the morning and iron at night (and don’t eat dairy at night). Another thing you can do is soak your feet in epsom salts. Low magnesium could be the issue. If you soak your feet and feel a lot better the following day, get some magnesium spray for any health food store. These are all very safe and inexpensive treatments.

      • suzy q says:

        Haven’t thought about the magnesum and will pick up some asap. When I was anemic before I did my own research and discovered I was anemic both ways – iron and b12 so took both.

  13. Moe says:

    The Raised Bed Garden is fantastic. I am pretty sure I came across the idea on this site back before the conversion. Harvesting greens of all kinds left and right. The first of the summer squash was picked today. I have always failed in the past with zucchini for some reason.

    The sweet potato slips arrived very dry so I soaked the roots for the better part of the week before transplanting into a raised box and into the smaller of the lasagna beds. So far most have survived the transplant which is great since we have had some triple digit heat since then.

    Neither the moringa nor the sponge seeds I planted have sprouted.

    Most of the work has been in the garden, but on the very hot afternoons I retreated to my sewing room in the basement. The outdoor patio furniture now has new cushions.

    Bought six cases of water on sale and added another 25 lbs of rolled oats. Also bought some milled flour and stocked up on sausage and ground beef. Grilling season is here.

    Between the tropical storms to the East and the fires to the West, we are on alert for Mother Nature. Stay safe everyone!

  14. skye says:

    Not much in the prepping department this week.

    What I watched:
    I ordered and watched the dvd, Panic in the Year Zero, with Ray Milland. It was made in the early sixties, and released just months before the Cuban missile crisis. It is about a family from Los Angeles that went camping just in time to miss a nuclear attack on Los Angeles.

    Some information is dated, as we know more about the realities of nuclear fallout than was known when this was made. The story of a man ensuring his family survives no matter what, was interesting. The dad adapted to the new reality quickly, while his wife had a hard time making that shift.

    I thought it gave a realistic interpretation of what different kinds of people would do in this situation. There was violence, but as this is an older film, it’s not the gross violence of modern day flicks. Because the violence was hinted at, and you had to fill in the gaps, it was more disturbing to me. It really brought home to me the kind of violence that some would resort to, and gave me a lot to think about.

    I give it a thumbs up.

    • Gloria says:

      I’ve seen that movie several times and always wonder where the dead bodies went. The naive daughter also had me shaking my head.

      • Gloria ,

        I’ve seen that movie several times and always wonder where the dead bodies went. The naive daughter also had me shaking my head.

        I’ve also seen it more than a few times and found it really interesting when it first came out back in 1962; but, I was only 11 years old then, and the myths about atomic weapons and fallout were still rather rampant. As for dead bodies, they just decompose and disappear leaving no odor or disease behind, doncha know, LOL
        Those were rather naïve days; but, in some ways they were a bit better I suppose; however, were “Ozzie & Harriet” and “My Three Sons” really the ideal family we may romanticize over today. Even the wholesome “Little House on the Prairie” ignores most of the hard work and disease that a pioneering farm family would encounter in the late 1800’s when you were truly off-grid.

        • Gloria says:

          As for dead bodies, they just decompose and disappear leaving no odor or disease behind, doncha know,

          And here I thought aliens swooped in and snatched them away.

  15. GA Red says:

    Spent most of the last two weeks watching the garden and weeds grow. Also put down more mulch. Ordered and received MD’s CD. Trying to stay in a shape that’s not round while continuing to heal some minor injuries. That’s about it.

    Prayers for all in need.

  16. Almost There says:

    Hi everyone,

    Rain and heat for the last 2 weeks. Hot and humid today.

    Passed my HAM technician license on the 23rd along with 6 others. WOOOHOOO. Got my call sign yesterday. Will go for my General in a few months.

    Made 18 trays of fruit leather with fresh and some frozen strawberries. Easy recipe, tastes delicious and they have been reported to last many years in vacuum sealed jars. Good source of vitamin C in storage. Blueberries in the freezer are next.

    Organizing and purging stuff, getting ready for yard sale at the end of the month.

    Barter Day last Saturday – Presentation on Puerto Rico and Venezuela was excellent. For bartering, I came home with a fig tree, damson plum, couple of healing plants (don’t remember what they are called), 4 – 4oz jars of honey, cast iron pot blocks that you put your hot pot on, training session for our other local group on our HAM radios. Most trades were for the chicken jerky that I make.

    FB MP – Excalibur dehydrator for $30, 20 dozen farm eggs $20 (going to dehydrate). Family with the eggs said they were getting 80 eggs a day, and were wanting to get rid of the surplus. I helped them achieve their goal. 🙂

    Aldi’s – They have camping stuff this week. Appears to be made of good quality. 2 CREE flashlights 200 lumens, 2 solar 6 gallon water shower bags, compact folding shovel, 6 rolls of painters tape, going back today to see if they had unloaded the truck for the knock-off atomic lanterns and check out the one person tent for my BOB.

    Garlic is still doing ok, went ahead and fertilized.

    Prayers for the pack, for healing, for unspoken requests, for the President and for America.

    • Prepared Grammy says:

      Congratulations on passing the test! I still haven’t taken mine. I’m completely ignorant in that area.

      • Almost There says:

        Thank you PG. I have to tell you it was tough, especially if you don’t know anything about electrical stuff. But it’s is totally doable. We had an ARRL member give us a class for 2 hours a week for about 6 weeks, that explained the questions so we would understand which answer to choose. Then I did many of the practice tests. Some of the questions, you just have to know the answer to. I wanted to get this done as soon as possible as this was a hole in my prep and we were offered a chance to purchase the radio at cost. No sense in having a radio that just sits in the box. I am sure you can do it. It’s just like starting anything, taking the first step is getting the book and start reading.

  17. Penrod says:

    DW is now two weeks post rotator cuff surgery. The lift chair we got has been a huge help both for getting in and out, and because it reclines flat so she can sleep in it. It holds her on her back so she can’t roll into her side and mess up the shoulder. Highly recommended for such surgery.

    I did a little noodling around online for houses on the Mainland, just enough to interest me. Won’t be looking seriously until late next year.

    • Almost There says:

      Penrod,

      Glad the Mrs is doing well. My mom had one of those chairs, and even after she passed away, it is still the go to chair after 11 years.

  18. Penrod says:

    Drudge Report had a link to a prepping article. Seemed a bit sensationalized, but did concentrate on the possibility of an electrical grid collapse and consequences. I can’t say the illustration of a possible retreat was impressive: it screams bunker, most of the first floor is wood, the front door is glass, with no windows overlooking it, so impossible to defend until the Bad Guys are inside. There were some reasonable comments about what normally decent people may do when their kids haven’t eaten in three weeks.

    Here: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5798241/How-preppers-plan-survive-grid-event-nations-power-supply-fails.html

    • Thor1 says:

      Penrod, interesting article…….

      • Penrod says:

        Hi Thor1, the name of the prepper/consultant they profiled didn’t ring any bells, but I do recognize the novels he wrote: the Equiping Modern Patriots series. I don’t think I’ve read any of them yet, tho.

  19. Greg M. says:

    Made crock pot bread last weekend. Good stuff. For anyone interested, recipes for all kinds of crock pot bread can be found with a google search. Prepared a box to send to the in-laws in the Philippines. Sending them seeds (flowers and vegetables), used clothing, soap, toothbrushes, a sewing kit, and a few other misc. items. Those are the kind of things that poor people over there want. We stockpile those items here a little at a time and then send when we have enough for a big box. Purchased some big plastic tote boxes to store items. Those sure do come in handy. Prayers for those who need them.

  20. It’s good to see this segment back here and to see someone with plants growing in the garden. Here we’re just starting to get the garden planted, and the local farmers are finally getting their corn planted, all due to the miserably wet spring and early summer.

    These past few weeks we did and acquired the following:
    1. Purchased a Gardenline Outdoor Gas Fire Table from Aldi’s. This will be added to the deck we are planning to build next month.
    2. Restarted cardiac rehab after a 2 ½ week sabbatical while the DW was up in Massachusetts tending to our DD who had surgery. I had been lifting weights and walking during that time and continued with no setbacks (thank heavens); but, did lose about 8 pounds.
    3. A box of electronics from my Hong Kong suppler including a new HD Pan/Tilt/Zoom camera, and 20 Kenwood microphones for various Amateur radio HT’s that I plan to sell at our upcoming Hamfest/TrunkFest
    4. Ordered Army Gear 10-in-1 Essential Emergency Survival Kit from woot.com
    5. Ordered 2 Colavita Extra Virgin Olive Oil 34oz from woot.com
    6. Picked up the Harbor Freight 100 watt solar panel kit
    7. 2 more pair of light work gloves from Harbor Freight
    8. 29 piece titanium drill bit set from Harbor Freight
    9. Picked up a few more 12” tool bags and a free screwdriver set from Harbor Freight
    10. Picked up another 60 LED security light from Harbor Freight
    11. Some additional spring clamps from Dollar Tree
    12. Started reading (actually listening to) “Guns, Germs, and Steel” by Jared Diamond
    13. Watched the documentary video: “How Beer Saved the World” which you can find @ https://topdocumentaryfilms.com/how-beer-saved-the-world/
    14. At Ollie’s: Wasabi Ranch and parmesan Garlic Freeze dried peas
    15. Also @ Ollie’s 40 oz orange and 20 oz cherry slices (gum drop style candy) & 3 boxes of Cracker Jacks
    16. Purchased an LG 10000 BTU 3-Speed Portable Air Conditioner with Dehumidifier & LCD Remote Control from Home Depot. It was their last one and a display model, so they gave me a 10% discount.
    17. I had a final tooth extracted in preparation for more work in July.
    18. Adventuridge Pop-Up LED Lantern Set from Aldi’s. Two LED lanterns with batteries for $10.00. I purchased 3 and will gift some to others who need them. These are basically clones of the Atomic Beam lantern and are great lights to have around, especially at that price.

  21. Always Forward says:

    Garden about ready to float away, but the sun is out today. Will see what survived. Wow! The generator arrived so now we need to read the manual and figure out how to use it. A nice feeling to have it, though. The weather seems so unsettled. 10 for $10 on pasta so stocked up on that. Also ground beef on sale to use for canning soon in the vegetable beef soup. The cannery opens at the end of this month. Ordered more essential oils and try to read and practice using them. Am going to try making rose petal jelly on Monday. Apparently roses like rain way more than I thought they did. May have not watered enough before. Organizing some closets and getting like-minded items together in totes and stored together. Keeping med appts up-to-date and not letting anything go. Getting some medicinal plants started around the yard. Would love to have an edible yard. With all the rain, it looks like a weed bed right now. Guys haven’t been able to come cut and trim. Maybe next week. Working hard on fitness. Want to be able to work all day if the need arises.
    Prayers for the Pack and our nation and president daily.

    • Moe says:

      Always Forward:
      We have been pretty dry here but this year’s roses are loaded with blooms. Not sure what else could be affecting the blooms.

    • Always Forward ,

      Garden about ready to float away, but the sun is out today. Will see what survived. Wow!

      That seems to be an all too common problem. If the weather were warmer we could be raising rice.

      The generator arrived so now we need to read the manual and figure out how to use it. A nice feeling to have it, though.

      Out of curiosity. What kind of generator and which fuel source. I agree on the good feeling and even though ours has only run a total of about 5 hours in the 18 months since installation to actually power the house we still think it was a good investment .

      . 10 for $10 on pasta so stocked up on that.

      Can you tell us the store that had that deal? We should all know better than to talk about deals without any details, LOL.

      Am going to try making rose petal jelly on Monday. Apparently roses like rain way more than I thought they did. May have not watered enough before.

      It seems odd that while we’re talking about being almost flooded out, some plants are too dry. It’s the same here also.

      Keeping med appts up-to-date and not letting anything go.

      For daily medications as well as OTC we do the same thing. There are not any we cannot live without; but, life is just better with the right drugs, LOL.

      Getting some medicinal plants started around the yard. Would love to have an edible yard.

      We are slowly working on the same thing; but, many of the indigenous plants have their own value. You just need to determine what you have and how to use them.

      With all the rain, it looks like a weed bed right now. Guys haven’t been able to come cut and trim. Maybe next week.

      Guys? You have Guys? Between the ZT moder and the push mower we’re keeping things pretty much under control; but, what we really need later this summer is to get the whole area rolled.

      Working hard on fitness. Want to be able to work all day if the need arises.

      Even if the need doesn’t arise, being able to work without passing out later is a good feeling. I’m doing cardiac rehab until the first week in July and the DW is also participating, sans the remote ECG. When the rehab stops I’ll switch to just a monthly membership and continue also without the ECG. Since our insurance plans both have the Silver Sneakers included, it’s a benefit that is basically free to us.

      • Always Forward says:

        Enjoyed your newsy replies! It’s the new Honda 2200. We have occasional ice storms when the trees knock out the power for several days. We are in the South and it was actually warm during the last outage, but hate to lose the frozen stuff and the frig stuff. We are prepared to cook in many ways and don’t mind going to bed early. Yeah, I know, but the guys are only here when necessary. They can do in 15 minutes what it would take me a couple days! Let’s just say we are not so young anymore and DS is getting Alzheimer’s so I am busy from morning to night. They come supervised from a Christian rehab center and love to get out and do physical stuff. They do the very STEEP grade work. Try to prioritize my time. I love hard work, but do not want to drop on the way – lol.
        Ingles grocery has the 10/10 and on several different known brands, not the store brand. I think the are only in the South. Publix and Kroger do that too, but, again, may just be in the South.

        • Always Forward,

          It’s the new Honda 2200. We have occasional ice storms when the trees knock out the power for several days. We are in the South and it was actually warm during the last outage, but hate to lose the frozen stuff and the frig stuff.

          Sounds like a nice generator since I’ve not seen a bad Honda yet. They are quiet and reliable. I understand about the refrigeration and in our case being on a well and septic, it’s also the water. My kid sister lives in Key West and was forced out in a hurry when hurricane Irma came calling. She was gone a little more than a week and while her house was undamaged, being without power for most of that week left the refrigerator and freezer were in well …. Rather bad shape when she returned, so I really understand.

          We are prepared to cook in many ways and don’t mind going to bed early.

          Same here. From the time I was about 10 until well into my marriage I used to tent or wilderness camp, and we have enough alternative lighting and heating to keep us in good shape, well before the new generator, and in the past we would often not even fire up the portable generators until the power had been out for quite a while, which was rare.

          Yeah, I know, but the guys are only here when necessary. They can do in 15 minutes what it would take me a couple days!

          I was just kidding about your guys, since we’ve been known to hire work done that I could do when I was younger, more fit, and less well off financially.

          Let’s just say we are not so young anymore and DS is getting Alzheimer’s so I am busy from morning to night.

          I understand that also, since the easy thing I used to do, can still be done; but, take care and more time to accomplish, if we decide to do them ourselves. I’m so sorry to hear about the Alzheimer’s. I have friends whose parents were afflicted with that awful disease and just watched people I once knew as vibrant intelligent souls, slowly waste away.

          They come supervised from a Christian rehab center and love to get out and do physical stuff. They do the very STEEP grade work. Try to prioritize my time. I love hard work, but do not want to drop on the way – lol.

          No steep grades here on the property that we care to manage. Other than a few whacks with a machete once in a while, on the only steep grade that leads down to our creek is pretty much easily kept in check; but, otherwise left alone and manages itself quite nicely, with the spring flooding keeping it from overrunning the property. Other than being a bit bumpy, our 3 acres or so of grass (not to be confused with lawn) is easily managed by the DW using our ZT mower, which gives her a good reason to be outside and sitting around.
          While none of us have dropped so far. I know of people my age or younger that overdo it and simply drop dead from an M.I., often when shoveling snow or doing something they were not in good enough shape to be doing. It pays to know your body and listen when it tells you to slow down or stop, even when you like the work and there is more to do. Then again, isn’t there always more to do?

          Ingles grocery has the 10/10 and on several different known brands, not the store brand. I think the are only in the South. Publix and Kroger do that too, but, again, may just be in the South.

          We have Kroger here; but, except for their occasional sale items, Wal-Mart and Aldi’s have generally better prices and deals. I will however admit to being a bit jealous about Publix, where everyone always seems to be getting deals.

          • GA Red says:

            OP – we have found that Publix is generally more expensive overall than Kroger. I’ve even found things at Whole Foods (aka Whole Paycheck) that were less expensive than both Publix and Kroger. It definitely pays to know your prices around here.

            • Izzy says:

              GA Red; It pays to know prices anywhere. Where I live…Walmart is actually higher on many things than the more expensive markets. Plus they quit price matching. For me, watching sales is the key to saving money. I think I am about 60-75% less shopping at Walmart these days.

              • Izzy, & GA Red,

                ; It pays to know prices anywhere.

                Absolutely. We get our normal (non mail order) prescriptions at the local Wal-Mart as well as some of our OTC meds & supplements and cat food, so we will wander the aisles for a few minutes while there, to look at prices and sale items. We also get the email flyers for them as well as Meijer’s, Aldi’s, and Kroger plus TSC & Rural King and sometimes Home Depot and Lowes. A trip to any of them is 15 miles one way; but, they are all within a 5 mile radius of each other, so we plan our trips to town with a list of things to get from the best selection or prices, occasionally adding in the local Goodwill thrift store.

                • GA Red says:

                  I totally agree on knowing your prices. There are only a few things we buy at Wal-Mart these days. One is Mobil1 motor oil – it’s actually cheaper there than at Sam’s, but recently found a good deal on Amazon for the same thing.

              • Shirlgirl says:

                I began shopping less at Wal-Mart when they let many employees go in lieu of the “auto- registers where not only do I haul my own into the basket, but must haul them onto the scale and check myself out. When you have 8 gallons of water, that is just downright frustrating. At 68 I measure how much weight I lift and how often. Not happy with that whole idea… and let I them know.

                • Almost There says:

                  I avoid WM as much as I can, and I also avoid the self check-outs wherever I am at, even if I have to wait a few moments in line for some to actually scan my stuff. If I have to go around and gather, they can at least scan it after I put it on the belt.

                  Recently, I saw people SITTING IN THEIR CAR, WITH THEIR CAR RUNNING, in those new pull up and wait while someone brings your stuff parking spots, and was shocked that here they would wait in their car, wasting gas, and I’m sure it costs to have someone go find your shopping list, and I was in and out before they got their stuff. We have lost our minds.

            • Livinthedream says:

              I agree that Publix is the most expensive grocery of all. They jack prices then pull a “BOGO”, when, in fact, much (not all) BOGO ends up same price as all other stores.
              However, they have the BEST bakery & deli, best organic produce selection, and they sell foods you can’t find in other groceries. Personally, I love Publix. I also really like Aldi’s for their organic choices & pricing, but they have shorter hours, NO customer service, and they’re often sold out of basic items!.

        • Bam Bam says:

          You can also do a Google search for that brand of pasta and coupon. Publix has lots of stuff BOGO. You can go online and print out coupons for those products. Publix will let you use a coupon for the one you buy and the one you get free. So if the pasta is one dollar and you have a stack of .25 cent off coupons. You can get the pasta for 75 percent off.

      • Always Forward says:

        It’s a gas generator.

  22. mom of three says:

    Picked a huge bowl of Strawberrys, and chopped a bunch of lettuce, for a salad, had some baby birds, in my bird house first time ever have birds, used the house walked by two days ago no peeping so I went ahead and opened it up took the nest out and found 1 baby did not make it So cleaned out the house for the season. Everything is growing great it’s nice to start to harvest I have a few buckets that the seeds must be duds because stuff should be popping up by now. I wacked back the Wistria bush, it’s finished for the season I took down about a dozen branches, and suckers, now my shoulders are hurting this morning. Got both my Rohdys, dead head, and chopped a few branches, off of them too got the lawns mowed, and cut the grass and got the it off the side walk. Pay day was yesterday, so not to many grocery items i will make a list of what were running out of. We have 8 days left of school, the kids are ready I”ve been helping my daughter, get her food handlers permit she has her red cross card a few places want both cards to work. Yard sales, are starting up one we’re going is at a church, just to look we really don’t need much it’s fun to just look so time to get moving have a great weekend 🙂

  23. Mari says:

    Gardening is a nightmare so far this year. When I wanted to plant early stuff, it wouldn’t stop snowing. And it’s been raining for almost 3 weeks. Been harvesting mesclun, some spinach (now bolted), and scallions. Turnips still forming up much. Hopefully the next few days of cooler weather will keep the Chinese cabbage going. Need sun!!!
    Two weeks now the whole house in an uproar. Had a couple of puff backs from the oil furnace. And now the insurance co and service co and next painters have everything buried. At least another week. Driving me nuts. And a maximum of four weeks yet to work, then shutdown.
    Was reading R.R. Haywoods “The Undead” series. It’s in Kindle library. Oh where oh when will book 23 come out. Now I’ve latched onto a side story that picks up the exploits of two characters before they hook up with the other good guys. Zombie book, one of the best I’ve read, and absolutely hilarious parts in 18, 20, and 21. Forewarning that loaded with lots of 4-letter words.

  24. Daddio7 says:

    The last two weeks in North Florida, rain, rain, and….more rain. It may not rain today but than again, it might. I found out that the area in front of my green house where I have my tomato containers located holds 5 inches of water after a heavy rain. I have got to get busy with the backhoe before my brother decides he needs it again. I did find a few hours to plug some more logs with mushroom spawn, seven shiitake and six hericium (lion’s mane). I have enough shiitake spawn (a different variety) to do seven more. That will be the last of my mushroom experiment.

    My field garden is half drowned and yellowing, I haven’t been able to fertilize anything. The sweet potatoes are loving it. If I don’t do something to them in few days they will be too thick to cultivate. I only lost two of the sets I got from George’s Plant Farm and that was because the deer had cropped them completely to the ground.

    My wife’s vision suddenly got much worse a month ago. She is only 51. A trip to a vision specialist revealed the problem, rapidly growing cataracts. Surgery on her right eye is scheduled for July 16th. The doctor said he will see how well that goes before doing the left eye. Hopefully her vision will not get so bad she can’t drive, She has an hour’s commute each day to work. With the doctor’s office the same hour’s drive away all the visits mean I need to do a lot of driving taking her. It does give us a good excuse to eat out. After the fist visit I navigated us to a French bistro (at least Jacksonville’s version). For $15 I got a baguette (a small half sub) and a cup of French onion soup. Both were incredibly good, no wonder people who can afford it eat at nice restaurants, I’m used to Denny’s and Huddle House.

    She had expensive Lasik surgery two years ago that was mostly ineffective and now that will make it harder for the eye surgeon to do a good job. Too bad the cataracts didn’t show up then. The Lasik surgery was out of pocket ($7000) but cataract surgery would have been covered by insurance. Such is life.

    • Daddio7 ,

      I did find a few hours to plug some more logs with mushroom spawn, seven shiitake and six hericium (lion’s mane). I have enough shiitake spawn (a different variety) to do seven more. That will be the last of my mushroom experiment

      Years ago I grew Shitake with some success from a kit with a pre inoculated log and it’s something I’ve been interested in ever since. I also understand that Morels can be grown instead of simply being “discovered”.
      My question for you, is what if any kind of specific log should be used for growing mushrooms?
      I mean, is a particular species of wood better than others. Here we have a lot of maple, ash, box elder, black walnut and some oak. I know the black walnut is nasty for growing at least some things and wondered if you had any suggestions.

      • Daddio7 says:

        The best is red oak but being I was clearing away trees from around my home I used those, a mix of live oak and water oak. Maple is also good. Online research on growing mushrooms will yield a plethora of sources of help. My last order of plugs was from fieldforest.com. Their web site is very informative as is the mushroom people site.

        This was just an experiment because I hated to just let all that wood just rot. I was removing the trees with a 30,000 lb backhoe and had already uprooted and shoved into the surrounding woods the smaller trees before I got the mushroom idea so all I had left were the huge ones. After I knocked them over I had a young man saw the branches up into usable lengths but even then I only used half of them. The last two were so large that only with much digging was I able to topple them but the root mass and trunks are too heavy for my machine to move. I can either hire someone with a big logging saw to cut them into manageable lengths or just let nature handle them. I live in a rural area, no HOA to complain about them.

        So far I only got 10 or 12 shiitake mushrooms from last years batch and no oyster mushrooms. They are supposed to bear for six or seven years so maybe next year. I plan of forcing some, you soak the overnight in cold water, to see if I can’t get some sooner.

        • Daddio7,
          The best is red oak but being I was clearing away trees from around my home I used those, a mix of live oak and water oak. Maple is also good. Online research on growing mushrooms will yield a plethora of sources of help. My last order of plugs was from fieldforest.com. Their web site is very informative as is the mushroom people site.

          This was just an experiment because I hated to just let all that wood just rot. I was removing the trees with a 30,000 lb backhoe and had already uprooted and shoved into the surrounding woods the smaller trees before I got the mushroom idea so all I had left were the huge ones. After I knocked them over I had a young man saw the branches up into usable lengths but even then I only used half of them. The last two were so large that only with much digging was I able to topple them but the root mass and trunks are too heavy for my machine to move. I can either hire someone with a big logging saw to cut them into manageable lengths or just let nature handle them. I live in a rural area, no HOA to complain about them.

          Daddio7,

          The best is red oak but being I was clearing away trees from around my home I used those, a mix of live oak and water oak. Maple is also good. Online research on growing mushrooms will yield a plethora of sources of help. My last order of plugs was from fieldforest.com. Their web site is very informative as is the mushroom people site.

          I’ll check online. Thanks for the names of the sites. A simple search for “how to grow mushrooms” yields 118,000,000 results, so it’s great to get some specific advice.

          This was just an experiment because I hated to just let all that wood just rot. I was removing the trees with a 30,000 lb backhoe and had already uprooted and shoved into the surrounding woods the smaller trees before I got the mushroom idea so all I had left were the huge ones. After I knocked them over I had a young man saw the branches up into usable lengths but even then I only used half of them. The last two were so large that only with much digging was I able to topple them but the root mass and trunks are too heavy for my machine to move. I can either hire someone with a big logging saw to cut them into manageable lengths or just let nature handle them. I live in a rural area, no HOA to complain about them.

          A 30,000 pound backhoe? Now that’s a toy I would love to have, LOL. No HOA here either so we can pretty much do what we want. A lot of unwanted trees get cut and stacked for firewood here, and when we have a lot we share with the neighbors and they do likewise.

          So far I only got 10 or 12 shiitake mushrooms from last years batch and no oyster mushrooms. They are supposed to bear for six or seven years so maybe next year. I plan of forcing some, you soak the overnight in cold water, to see if I can’t get some sooner.

          My Shitake log produced a bunch of little mushrooms for about 5 years; but, that was kept indoor on a back porch and kept wet with city water many years ago. I’m hoping that I can get something started here that will sort of take care of itself as a perennial. Good to know it’s possible.
          Thanks.

    • Jeffrey Fitzpatrick says:

      LASIK…biggest mistake/regret/bad choice of my life. I can now count blades of grass half a mile away but can no longer see the food on my plate without reading glasses. $5000.00 I should have invested in preps.

  25. Tony says:

    Ordered 3 of the knife sharpeners Jesse reviewed
    Weeded the garden and tended the fruit trees, grapes and berrys
    Very warm DW and I had the keep the chickens cool
    Set up 2 new bee hives and harvested much honey
    Sunflowers are coming up about 12 inches tall, feed the seed to the chickens during winter

    And enjoy reading everyone’s post each week MD please keep it going!

  26. Penrod says:

    An apparent prepper who really may be mentally ill (he’s a hoarder, including garbage, if the story is to be believed) made some sad news when a man digging a tunnel for him died of smoke inhalation:

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/06/02/us/nuclear-bunker-fire.html

    • Penrod,

      An apparent prepper who really may be mentally ill (he’s a hoarder, including garbage, if the story is to be believed) made some sad news when a man digging a tunnel for him died of smoke inhalation:

      It sounds like he has some issues with hoarding. We are sometimes a bit cluttered; but, it’s clean and there are no trails between the piles. I find it interesting that they are charging the owner with homicide; but, since IANAL I suppose there could be some potential liability on his part; but, then again the guy digging the tunnel was 21 and it didn’t sount like anyone was forcing him to do the work.
      While the article mentioned bomb shelters it also mentioned the nukes and ballistic missiles from NK and never specifically mentioned the words: “prepper” or “survivalist” which I find both surprising and refreshing.
      It takes all kinds to make a country, and the upside of this if there is one, is he won’t be starring in an upcoming remake of Doomsday Preppers.
      I also find it odd that there were tunnels stretching some 200 feet for a bomb shelter, that could have been much more compact, easier to build, and less dangerous.

      • Zulu 3-6 says:

        TOP and Penrod,

        There are a lot more hoarders out there than you might expect. Everyone of them I had contact with was mentally ill. For that matter, most of them I had contact with were dead by the time I met them. Their families finally decided to wonder why they hadn’t heard from them and called the police to check for them. Some had died from natural causes, some had a big pile of junk fall on them and which either killed them outright or trapped them until they died of dehydration or starvation. The families knew they were hoarders and had mental issues, but did nothing about it.

        They weren’t preppers in any reasonable sense of the word. The junk they collected was mostly just that: junk. Amazing piles of old newspapers, magazines, books, clothing, and plain old fashioned trash (empty food cans, etc). Tiny passageways through the junk. Massive fire hazards.

        At one hoarder’s place, we could clearly smell a decomposing body from outside the house. They (mother and son) had two nasty Dobermans their vet told us not to trust as he didn’t. We had to have the fire department come out and remove a window casing to a bedroom to gain access as all of the doors but one were blocked with junk. The one open door was blocked by the two mean dobes.

        As I entered the bedroom the window casing gave us access to, I found the body (mom) when I stepped through and stepped on her face. Nice crunchy sound and feel. Her son had put her on the bed, built up boxes on either side of her, and covered everything with a blanket. It looked like a nicely made bed I was going to step onto. The dobes came into the bedroom, but didn’t like the 12-guage I was pointing at them and left. After we were able to get the dogs out, a tour of the house was incredible as far as the extent of hoarding. The basement was almost 100% full of stuff, floor to ceiling.

        Dog crap and pee all over the places not covered in junk. Quite disgusting. Worst hoarding house I was ever in, though I wouldn’t be surprised if there were still worse out there.

        Mom died from natural causes about ten-days before, in summer-time, in an un-air conditioned house. Sonny-boy had admitted himself to a mental hospital a few days after mom died and wrote a letter to a former employer who contacted the police. Oddly, there were very few insects in the place. Normally, I would expect quite a crowd of flies and maggots around the body under the conditions we found her in, not to mention scads of standard issue cockroaches all over the rest of the place. But, nope. Puzzling.

    • Mari says:

      Way too close to DC even underground.

  27. Brenda says:

    We finally got our new rain barrels set up and thanks to all the rain we have been getting, they are all full! That is 2,100 gal of water stored!

    The garden is doing well. The grapevines and the blackberry bushes are loaded with fruit.

    We have both been well, no sickness so far this year! I am still working to regain my strength, improving but not there yet.

    DH and a friend cut down 2 dead trees in the back yard. We have 2 Stuart pecan trees ready to plant when we get that cleaned up. Lots of firewood for later use.

    Prayers to all.

    • Almost There says:

      Brenda,

      On filling your rain barrels, were they all hooked up to down spouts? That is amazing to have all that water, and it’s replenishable for free! Could you please elaborate a little bit on your set up, size of barrels, tanks, etc.?

  28. Babycatcher says:

    Went to a nearby state to watch my two youngest grandchildren graduate from High School! The middle one was a year behind the oldest grandchild, but decided to graduate with the youngest one. I am so proud of all three of them, and their parents and step parents for working so hard to raise them well as they could. My former son in law and his wife had a very nice little shindig for the graduates. I took my granddaughter out to lunch and went thrift store shopping. We had fun. Garden is behind, horses are behind. Will just have to catch up as best I can til after Field Day. Then I can rest a little bit.

  29. AXELSTEVE says:

    some ammo this week. I scored a bulk box of Federal and 100 rounds of mini mags. I have been stocking up cause the gun ammo commies in komradfornia. I need to stock up on some more center fire.

  30. MM says:

    Good Morning Pack –

    MD, Thank you for the seed storage tips – this is an area we need to explore further in our preps and develop a better plan and rotation for the future.

    This past week –
    Vehicles – tires, rotated and balanced, coolant flushed and refilled. Truck passed the overall check, so the BO vehicle is in good shape.

    Purchased – Air mattress, air pump and roll up table to round out our camping gear. Just need to plan a few get-always this summer now.

    Garden/Foodscape – Pruned the citrus trees and deep watered the fig and tangelo. Lots of figs coming out and should be getting ripe soon. Herbs are looking good, parsley, sage, basil and oregano. Armenian cucumbers are coming up nicely and the blackberries are starting to ripen.

    Chickens are doing good – still laying an average of 3 eggs/day. We are using our shade cover to help them stay cool now that the temps are getting up there

    Stockpile – Had a very successful trip to the local fruit/veggie market. They have a “Scratch and dent” shelf where you can get some amazing bargains. Picked up 5 cantaloupe for $2, and over two weeks worth of fruits and veggies for $20. Found a great sale on chuck roast (1.97/lb) and stocked up on 25 lbs for the freezer. We love a chuck roast dinner!

    Took 5 days off to explore New Mexico with DH – beautiful area – the SW is so dry right now it’s a real concern. Please pray for rain (no lightning, please!) to come to this very dry area. We visited a winery and tried some green chili wine, that was actually surprisingly good! We had our BOB and GHB’s with us on the trip and although they were not needed, it added a sense of security that we would be in good shape if the unexpected happened with us away from home.

    We reorganized our long term storage area and rotated some the stockpile to ensure FIFO (First In, First Out)..

    Take care and God bless,
    MM

  31. This is for two weeks. Finished planting veggies in the raised beds and have already harvested 20 French Breakfast radishes from a small patch. Have another patch of Sparkler radishes will be ready this week. I mulched the DW’s flower garden with black mulch. Flowers look nice sitting in that black bed. Been going through the garage sorting out stuff to be tossed or put in yard sale later this summer. It’s amazing the things I’m tempted to save because I might, maybe, possibly have a use for it someday. Then I realize the stuff is just taking up room that could be used for something I really do want or want more of. Sigh! Whatever good stuff in the yard sale that doesn’t sell will be donated to a local veterans thrift store. That’s what I did with previous yard sales. My consolation in getting rid of such stuff is that since I haven’t had a use for it, maybe some one else will.

  32. Thor1 says:

    Oregon has a city with toxic water red algae, fires in CA,NM and CO……

    • Thor1 says:

      CA, regulating how much water you can use per day……..

    • suzy q says:

      That is one of Oregon’s major cities. Like hawaii, Oregon had some issues with getting the information out using their emergency notification system. Hope they figure it out before they have to notify my county about anything.

  33. Almost There says:

    Deal Alert – This site has lots of info for dehydrating. They have a sale going on until tomorrow (Monday) on their e-books. Coupon code 33%over10. It’s also a great reference site.

    http://www.21stcenturysimpleliving.com/shop/

  34. Bam Bam says:

    I just purchased the “Dance Like the NSA isn’t Watching” t-shirt in deep royal. That’s a clever saying.

    Hurricane season has started and it is expected to be an above average season. We are in good shape, of course. But I had to bring our cases of water up to hurricane season standards. I also purchased canned foods (ravioli, beefaroni, chili, tuna, soups, etc.), as well as extra bleach wipes and bleach. We don’t typically eat this kind of food. We buy it for hurricane season and then donate what remains to the local food pantry. Then buy it anew every hurricane season.

    The weeks kind of blend together and I have a hard time remembering what I do from week to week. I think it was last week that Zaycon had flash sale on chicken breast–99 cents a pound. I couldn’t pass that up. So I bought another 80 lbs. (This is not scheduled for delivery until September.) That makes 25 lbs. chuck roast, 40 lbs. of 93/7 ground beef, 25 lbs. of ribs and 160 lbs. of chicken. With fuel prices increasing, the price of meat will increase as well. I want to get my orders in before the price goes up.

    I went to my first taekwondo tournament. I placed fourth in sparring and fourth in combat weapons. This was a small tournament. So I competed agains woman over the age of 18 of every belt. I beat one black belt at combat weapon. I had to fight a third degree black belt. She was like 20 years old and she couldn’t have been more than five feet tall. She was a ninja. She kicked my butt.

    My school placed first and second in men’s combat weapon, second in men’s sparring, third in women’s traditional form and second and third in women’s sparring.

    We really went to check out black belt testing. To be promoted to black belt, you need to do your traditional form, weapons form, show proficiency in combat weapon and sparring, and pass the fitness test (30 pushups, 50 situps, and a series of 300 designed kicks and punches in less than six minutes. People under 40 have to complete all this in under five minutes.) The fitness test is designed to show that you are in the top 10 percent in fitness for your age group. I have much work to do here.

  35. Livinthedream says:

    DH & I, collaborating w/local Police Dept., did our first Emergency Preparedness (Always Ready) class in our community on Sat. Not our first –
    just first one here. Very pleased w/how it went & feedback. Have been asked to do it again by many who could not attend the first. Time well spent!

    • Livinthedream,

      DH & I, collaborating w/local Police Dept., did our first Emergency Preparedness (Always Ready) class in our community on Sat. Not our first –

      I’ve been involved presenting a program on Emergency Preparedness here sponsored by our county EMA. I also used to teach a NRA (non firearm) course called: “Refuse to be a victim”
      The later class was developed to teach to the church ladies and other organizations that didn’t want to deal with firearms; but, many of these same organizations now take our CHL courses; but, still ask for our Emergency Preparedness seminar.
      Does your Emergency Preparedness (Always Ready) have a standard curriculum? If so I would like to see it and potentially include some of its message in our program.
      Jesse and Overwatch have seen the program we present if you have questions and need unbiased answers.

    • Almost There ,

      Interesting numbers… Where to live?

      Well sort of. This only takes in to account the purchase of housing and I suspect the houses are in urban or suburban areas.
      It doesn’t take into account the other factors like energy required to heat in the winter or cool in the summer. Heating is by far the easiest task since a combination of layering and burning anything from Natural Gas & Propane, to coal or wood is manageable and relatively inexpensive.
      The article doesn’t mention income tax or sales tax or many other factors that make a region a place any of us might want to live. Here in Ohio I can travel from any city into a rural or wooded area for camping & recreation within about a 90 minute drive.
      Other costs like food, especially fresh food from farm markets are also within easy access.
      And then there are the hazards like hurricanes, earthquakes, tornados and most recently in both Hawaii & Guatemala, volcanoes (and yes I realize that Guatemala is not a US state).
      As I recall, you are from TN, as are some other members of the pack. I bring this up because of a little place called Oak Ridge that was mentioned in the new A&E documentary tonight called: The Plot Against America
      Right now all they have is a short clip; but, I suspect there will be the full video available soon. Russians all over TN and no doubt other places as well.

    • GA Red says:

      AT – don’t you just love averages and medians? For Georgia – Salary needed to afford a home: $59,520. Median household income: $53,559. The only places in Georgia you can get a house on that kind of salary is where there are few, if any jobs.

  36. Almost There says:

    WOW… Not so sure this is a good thing…

    “In addition to the surveillance cameras, Chinese police are now beginning to wear smart glasses designed by the company that aim to establish a “social credit score” for each of the country’s 1.4 billion citizens.”

    https://www.trunews.com/stream/china-provides-1-6b-in-new-ai-camera-funding

  37. Grammyprepper says:

    Well, I survived graduation weekend, and made/helped make 50+ party trays at work…Much neglected garden is doing well. Still needs mulched. I also need to figure out a staking/caging situation. With several diff varieties of tomatoes, might need to employ different strategies. Even at this early time, I am seeing that each variety needs different care. Kids moved out the past weekend, miss my GS! BUT it has spurred us to do some clean out and purging of our own. Lots of pitching and donating, but have a few things I would prefer to try selling first. I have never used craigs list or fb selling walls before, so I would appreciate any input. g

    • MaineBrain says:

      Grammyprepper,

      Selling on your local Craigslist is easy. Just make sure you’re at Craigslist-dot-ORG. But beware of any potential buyer whose English grammar or spelling is a little “off,” or who wants to pay by an unusual means (Apple gift cards, etc.). Also, for portable items, consider doing the transfer at your local police station, rather than having the buyer come to your house. A lot of police departments are encouraging this practice now.

      • Grammyprepper says:

        Thanks for the tips MaineBrain! And our local PD does offer their parking lot for such transfers. I believe the local Kroger does as well, since they also have cameras. But yeah, I would use the PD.

    • Almost There says:

      Grammyprepper,

      For CL – Agree with MainBrain’s comments. I’ve met people in public parking lots as well. I will also only allow e-mail at first, and then if they “sound” normal, meaning you don’t have any small voice telling you to pass on a potential buyer, then I give them my cell phone number. There are some people that allow text only, and occasionally I have done that. The listing is good for 45 days. Every 48 hours, I will renew the post so it goes back up to the top of the list.

      For FB – All messages are via messenger. I usually check out someone’s profile to see if there’s anything I get a bad vibe with… For me selling, I always meet someone at a public place. So far, I’ve not sold anything that I wasn’t able to transport. I’ve found a bunch of good stuff on there for cheap. I always have cash, and only accept cash. Your posting are good for 7 days, and then you can renew for I think, 5 more times.

      For both, I always have good pictures. Hop this helps.

  38. Hummingbird says:

    Been quite awhile since I’ve posted, but occasionally checked in and appreciate the knowledge shared. Great t shirt designs.
    Main focus has been reducing maintenance. I sold one flatbed trailer and have interest in the gooseneck. When it goes, the number of tires to maintain will be below 50. 1 tiller, a riding mower and a few other implement are going away (less gas engine maintenance) My son took a generator still in orig box, 1 small one is leaving, and will be down to 3. Had to throw out some vaccum packed food 5-7 years old, so it’s better organized.
    I had access to an abandoned garden and was able to salvage cilantro and radishes. Found a recipe on line for pickled radishes and have 14 pints. Very salty right out of the jar, but rinsed are good in salad and on hamburgers.
    I was given some lambs ear and am dehydrating leaves to make oil infusion to relieve fly bites on the horses. Read that fresh leaves rubbed on wasp stings will reduce swelling.
    Taught 2 people dry canning.
    1 mare went to a family and it’s good. Give her a kid to take care of and she’s happy.
    The mini, cart and harness are probably going to a therapeutic riding facility.
    Been catching up on tree trimming and highly recommend this rachet/anvil lopper – Spear & Jackson 8290RS hand loppers. Very rugged and I think $44 on Amazon is a bargain.
    Best wishes to all for health and healing.

  39. MaineBrain says:

    If you live in the Northeast, Shaw’s supermarkets has their Signature pasta on sale starting tomorrow, 3/$1. They also have Green Mountain coffee for 4.99 lb. I think they’re affiliated with Safeway so the prices may be good there too,